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Treating Psoriasis using Cryotherapy

What is Psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a hereditary, autoimmune illness affecting nearly 8 million people in the United States of America and close to 3% of the world’s population. Psoriasis can bring about serious pain which is sometimes treated with skin creams, medicated shampoos, oral solutions, improved diet and more recently cryotherapy.

There are generally 5 types of psoriasis which lead to chronic inflammation with symptoms including:

Plaque – Thick red patches of skin, red, bothersome patches

Guttate – Small red spots on the torso, limbs, face, and scalp

Inverse – Red, shiny, smooth rash in skin folds

Pustular – White pustules surrounded by red skin

Erythrodermic – Resembles severe burns and covers large portions of the body

How does Cryotherapy Help Psoriasis?

2012-08-25 12.55.54Simply put, when your body is exposed to sub freezing temperatures, your veins widen and blood stream is pulled far from the skin with an end goal to keep your organs warm.

This is your body’s response to avoid going into hypothermia.

Once the cryosauna session is finished, your blood stream surges back through your body and skin to the point of feeling a tingling sensation. This is  your blood stream expanding and flushing out poisons resulting in skin revival, enhanced collagen levels, energetic looking skin and decreased blemishes.

1st time cyrotherapy users always find the tingling sensation quite the phenomenon.

 

Treat Psoriasis with Whole Body Cryotherapy

Do not let psoriasis lessen your confidence and self esteem.

Schedule a session online today or stop by to learn more ways routine cryotherapy sessions can help psoriasis and other skin conditions.

We are conveniently located at 3872 Roswell Rd in the heart of Atlanta just minutes from 400 and Lenox Mall.

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Going Global with Health and Wellness

Heading into the holiday season, I wanted to let you know about the projects I have started in San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua. As a physical therapist, I have always wanted to help a country in need through my training in health and fitness.

After a trip for pure fun to Nicaragua in 2012, I was moved by the passion and energy of a country who had come so far through war to where they are today. I immediately started to research how I could get started working with children and in physical therapy.

Since March 2012, I have opened my business Live With Passion that is focused on health and wellness in the US and a specific effort to build a wellness center in SW Nicaragua for health education and prevention. We have completed the following projects so far:
– Completed 3 visits of free physical therapy clinics for the local community working with the mayor, Rosa Elena Bello
– Delivered 200 pairs of shoes and school supplies to schools in Playa Remanso, Rivas, Nicaragua
– Delivered 6 boxes of medical supplies to San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua
– Began a pen pal program for The Globe Academy (Atlanta, GA) and Playa Maderas, Rivas, Nicaragua school district
– Began NicaFit Retreats that are boot camp and primal fitness retreats focused on cultural immersion and exploration while completing a community service project

From November 8-24, Live With Passion will be returning to Nicaragua with 200 pairs of shoes, 4 boxes of children’s clothes, and 6 boxes of school supplies. We will be cleaning up two poor schools on the coast including landscaping. Last, we will be hosting our first community workout on the beach to influence a healthy lifestyle.

If you are interested in learning more about projects with Live With Passion or donations please contact me:lauren@livewithpassionllc.com.

I would like to thank ICEBOX CRYOTHERAPY for always being a huge supporter of our efforts to heal as many communities in the world as we can.

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Ice Baths are to Cryotherapy, What a Nap is to a Full Night’s Sleep

In the last year of operation, we at CryoStudio have grown to love cryotherapy more than we did when we first were introduced (although it was love at first sight/try). We often describe it like “chocolate”. How do you tell someone how chocolate tastes? You don’t – you have them try it for themselves. As is the case with cryotherapy, you will only get it if you get in and try it for yourself.

 
Furthermore, to be completely fair to the therapy – you have to be willing to give it an honest effort. What does an honest effort mean? Well, it doesn’t mean getting in for one therapy session (2.5 minutes) and expecting miracles. One session will show you what to expect and in a high percentage of people, will yield amazing results. But if you want those results to last longer, or if you have a pretty serious injury, condition or level of pain or soreness- then we recommend committing to 5 sessions, all of which should be completed within a couple of days of each other.
 
If you want to learn about the MANY (so, so many) benefits of cryotherapy first hand, we highly recommend it. Take advantage if you are privileged enough to have one in your city, because there are still only around 20 in the country.
 
But rather than focusing on the benefits, this blog post is about common misconceptions:
 
Whole Body Cryotherapy is not a glorified ice bath. It is not a more expensive ice bath. It is not an ice bath at all. I doesn’t involve water submersion, the temperatures are out of this world different (no, really – cryotherapy temperatures are that of outer space), it doesn’t involve cooling the soft tissue, it is not painful and miserable and hated by many. More broadly – an ice bath is pretty good at decreasing inflammation (I lived in a big whirlpool of ice water for at least 30 minutes after very many collegiate track practices, and I absolutely knew why I was putting myself through the misery – it helped!). But aside from decreasing inflammation and therefore relieving SOME pain in the muscles, the ice bath offers no other benefits. (It does offer TONS of issues though – not the least of which is staph infection, and hygienic issues). As the title reads, comparing an ice bath and what it does for the body to Cryo is like comparing the rest and recovery your body gets from 10 minutes of sleep versus a full night’s sleep.
 
This analogy may be confusing for some since Cryo is only 2.5 minutes while an icebath exceeds 20, so let me explain. The healing of cryotherapy does not occur in those few minutes of the treatment. That’s right – those cold 2-3 minutes are simply a stimulus.
 
Think of it this way – its similar to exercise. Adaptation occurs during recovery. The workout? Not a whole lot of good stuff going on there – muscles microtearing (that’s what that soreness comes from), oxygen levels peaking and dropping, metabolic disturbance, a bunch of things that, physiologically, your body doesn’t exactly appreciate. However, when you stop (and you refuel and recover appropriately) your body will love you as it morphs into a stronger, healthier and more active body. Once you complete your cryo session, your body also loves you once more (during the session, it’s a little shocked!)
 
Which leads us to the first common misconception. Cryo does not hurt. I know you’ve read about athletes doing the “crazy” “painful” cold treatments. Sensational headlines sell, we get it. But truth is, cryo is not even uncomfortable for most folks. It may be for some (everyone’s cold tolerance is different) – but so is soreness, pain, inflammation, overweight, metabolic syndrome, arthritis and the slew of other reasons people seek help here. Remember, it’s only 2.5 minutes. And if you need a marker to identify just how uncomfortable it is or isn’t: everyone we have treated who has also sat in a vat of ice water will tell you it’s nowhere near as uncomfortable as that.
 
The premise behind the dry, cold nitrogen gas – it doesn’t penetrate the skin’s surface more than 1/2mm into the skin. It just gets the skin’s cold receptors cold – sending a stimulus to the brain and causing some pretty wonderful reactions. One of those is the constriction of the peripheral arteries which sends blood directly to the core (gotta protect the important organs, the body decides). So body core temperature can be elevated, not decreased. While there, the blood picks up more nutrients, faster, than it normally would. The session stops and your body is reintroduced into room temperature environment, causing those constricted little blood passageways to dilate tremendously (this is why we see, sometimes, a temporary increase in blood pressure systolically). What happens next is the body’s amazing ability to heal itself. Systems check in the brain: what hurts, what’s not working, where is their inflammation, what needs repair? Check. Sending blood. This newly oxidized and nutrient packed blood is delivered where it’s needed most.
 
Another misconception is that the whole body does not need to be treated if the whole body is not in pain. Cryotherapy addresses any and all issues you may have in your entire body with one treatment. Still not convinced you need the whole body treated? Talk to a chiropractor, a physical therapist, an athletic trainer or an orthopedist about false symptomatic pain. I bet they will tell you that they see a large number of clients who complain of knee pain, address knee pain directly and see no results – only to find out that their knee pain was caused by a tight IT band, hip misalignment, over compensations, spinal alignment, etc. Pain is not always a good indicator of the problem area.
 
My favorite thing about cryotherapy? It’s not a high-tech and new-age as it sounds. Cold is a sound, proven, age-old technology. But with science, we have been lucky enough to create this simple yet effective stimulus that kick-starts the body’s own natural healing process(es). And no matter the studies, the critics, the nay-sayers, the pessimists or cynics – your body knows itself better than anyone else. And my body, as well as those of our clients – trust and love the healing that their body provides them, courtesy of cryotherapy.
 
via- cryostudio of austin
Icebox cryotherapy
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BRRRR….With Benefits

Ice, Ice Baby

You whirl it into smoothies and use it to cool down drinks on a hot summer day, but did you know ice can also boost metabolism, relieve pain and tighten your skin? If you’ve ever applied an ice pack to a sprained ankle (or to your head after one too many margaritas) and felt the relief, imagine cooling down your entire body the same way. Only instead of an ice pack, you’re put into a chamber with nitrogen, which brings temps down to a chilly minus 270 degrees Fahrenheit.

cryotherapy-healing-sports-injuries-with-iceBrrrrr with health benefits

It may sound as if you’d freeze instantly, but Dr. Alan Christianson, NMD, owner of Integrative Health and co-author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Thyroid Disease says “many describe the sensation of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) to standing in front of an open freezer door.” So if you’ve ever stood in front of the freezer spooning Ben & Jerry’s right out of the container after a bad date, you know the feeling.

Christianson says the benefits of cryotherapy include:

  • Pain relief from tendinitis, fibromyalgia, arthritis and migraines
  • Improved athletic performance by enhancing muscle endurance, increasing speed and strength, and speeding recovery
  • Increased metabolism and more calories burned
  • Increased energy
  • Improved skin, reduced cellulite and more elastic skin, treatment for dermatitis and psoriasis and repaired tissue
  • Enhanced endorphins, which improve depth of sleep, and relieve stress and depression

How cryotherapy works

Inside the Cryosauna chamber, you are gently sprayed with a mist of nitrogen. (Nitrogen is safe and non-toxic and makes up 80 percent of our natural atmosphere.) This dry mist gently chills the skin while leaving your core warm, thus stimulating your body’s natural healing process, says Christianson. “The temperature level in whole body cryotherapy is brisk but very tolerable,” he adds.

Many people feel significant benefits after just one treatment. “For continued benefits, we recommend one treatment per week for one month, with continued treatments once or twice per month. For relief of significant pain or skin disease, we recommend up to 10 treatments in close succession (e.g. , three times per week) for maximum results. For continued benefits, we recommend treatments one to four times per month.”

Cryotherapy isn’t for everyone

WBC is not recommend for pregnant women or those with uncontrolled blood pressure, heart disease, seizures, Raynaud’s syndrome or acute infection, says Christianson. “Patients within the ages of 12 to 18 years old can be treated with parental consent.”

Feel like chillin’? WBC is quickly becoming available in most metropolitan areas, says Christianson. For a list of current WBC locations in the United States, go to lifeofmillennium.com/mii-usa.php

Ice Bath Vs. Icebox

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2012-09-04 15.04.05The Ice Bath has been regularly used in professional sports for the rehabilitation of athletes from injuries and/or heavy workouts. But the Ice Bath affects the body in a completely different way then does the Whole Body Cryotherapy at ICEBOX, which has now been shown to be much more beneficial, with no negative side effects.

First, during the 15-20 minutes of Ice Bathing, tissue freezes quite deep and frozen muscles temporarily lose capacity. Muscle tissue needs time to return to normal and after the Ice Bath the body needs rest. So regardless of the time of day when the Ice Bath took place, the athlete cannot get back to practice earlier than the next day. In contrast, ICEBOX does not actually freeze muscles tissue, it only creates a powerful illusion that the body freezes. Therefore, only 5-10 minutes after an ICEBOX session, an athlete can continue to work out or perform, completely energized and able to make full use of the day.

Next, the body’s reaction to cryotherapy temperatures (temperatures lower than -110C or -166F) in the Cryo device is radically different from its reaction to low temperatures while submerged in the Ice Bath. The biggest difference lies in the fact that , when gradually cooled in an Ice Bath, the body attempts to warm as much blood as possible in its core in order to send it to the peripheral parts to maintain warm skin surface. In other words, while in an Ice Bath, the body is struggling with actual, unrelenting, penetrating physical cold (not just signals from skin cold sensors). The process continues, while the body tries to generate sufficient heat to maintain warmth in the peripheral body parts. When the heat is no longer enough, the muscles start to congeal and freeze, beginning at the skin surface and continuing inward to the body’s center. For this reason, longer stays in the Ice Bath can cause hypothermia that can lead to death, as it is very difficult to stop this process once begun.

But in the cryo device at ICEBOX, the skin surface reaches temperature of -1C/32F in just 30-40 seconds while the circulating temperatures around the skin reach -170C (this is impossible in an Ice Bath where skin temperatures cannot drop lower than +5C/41F). The signal sent from the skin to the brain about the new critical environment is so powerful that the brain understands immediately – it is impossible to keep the peripheral parts of the body warm. Instead, blood vessels and capillaries undergo severe vasoconstriction to keep the body’s core temperature from dropping, triggering the processes described previously which include enrichment of blood and circulating it to internal organs under higher blood pressure. This never happens in an Ice Bath. Lastly, while in the Ice Bath, oxygen supply to the skin surface is interrupted, and it causes skin surfaces injury that can promote skin problems if the procedure is often repeated.

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